Asthma Management Handbook
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Table. Non-emergency use of bronchodilators (relievers) in children aged 1–5 years

Age Dose Mode of delivery

1–2 years

Salbutamol (100 microg per puff)

1–4 puffs as needed (one at a time)

Repeat if needed

Pressurised metered-dose inhaler plus spacer and face mask

3–5 years

Salbutamol (100 microg per puff)

1–4 puffs as needed (one at a time)

Repeat if needed

Pressurised metered-dose inhaler plus spacer (if able to cooperate)

  • Do not prescribe oral salbutamol.

Table lists usual salbutamol doses to be administered by parents/carers in the community to manage symptoms as needed. Higher during may be given during acute episodes, including emergencies.

Notes:

Manage wheezing episodes with inhaled short-acting beta2 agonist (salbutamol) as needed if associated with increased work of breathing (i.e. intercostal retraction).

Most children can inhale from a spacer from age 3–4 years.

Wheezing infants aged less than 12 months old should not be treated for asthma. Wheezing in this age group is most commonly due to acute viral bronchiolitis or to small and/or floppy airways. infants with clinically significant wheezing should be referred to a paediatric respiratory physician or paediatrician.

Last reviewed version 2.0

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