Asthma Management Handbook
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Table. Definition of levels of recent asthma symptom control in children (regardless of current treatment regimen)

Good control Partial control Poor control

All of:

  • Daytime symptoms ≤2 days per week (lasting only a few minutes and rapidly relieved by rapid-acting bronchodilator)
  • No limitation of activities
  • No symptoms§ during night or when wakes up
  • Need for SABA reliever# ≤2 days per week

Any of:

  • Daytime symptoms >2 days per week (lasting only a few minutes and rapidly relieved by rapid-acting bronchodilator)
  • Any limitation of activities*
  • Any symptoms during night or when wakes up††
  • Need for SABA reliever# >2 days per week

Either of:

  • Daytime symptoms >2 days per week (lasting from minutes to hours or recurring, and partially or fully relieved by SABA reliever)
  • ≥3 features of partial control within the same week

SABA: short-acting beta2 agonist

† e.g. wheezing or breathing problems

‡ child is fully active; runs and plays without symptoms

§ including no coughing during sleep

# not including doses taken prophylactically before exercise. (Record this separately and take into account when assessing management.)

‚Äč* e.g. wheeze or breathlessness during exercise, vigorous play or laughing

†† e.g. waking with symptoms of wheezing or breathing problems

Notes:

Recent asthma control is based on symptoms over the previous 4 weeks. Each child’s risk factors for future asthma outcomes should also be assessed and taken into account in management.

Validated questionnaires can be used for assessing recent symptom control:
Test for Respiratory and Asthma Control in Kids (TRACK) for children < 5 years
Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) for children aged 4–11 years

Last reviewed version 2.0

Asset ID: 23