Asthma Management Handbook

Checking whether current treatment is appropriate

Recommendations

Assess and record the level of recent asthma symptom control and compare after any changes in management so you can judge their effect.

Table. Definition of levels of recent asthma symptom control in adults and adolescents (regardless of current treatment regimen)

Good control

Partial control

Poor control

All of:

  • Daytime symptoms ≤2 days per week
  • Need for reliever ≤2 days per week
  • No limitation of activities
  • No symptoms during night or on waking

One or two of:

  • Daytime symptoms >2 days per week
  • Need for reliever >2 days per week
  • Any limitation of activities
  • Any symptoms during night or on waking

Three or more of:

  • Daytime symptoms >2 days per week
  • Need for reliever >2 days per week
  • Any limitation of activities
  • Any symptoms during night or on waking

† Not including SABA taken prophylactically before exercise. (Record this separately and take into account when assessing management.)

Note: Recent asthma symptom control is based on symptoms over the previous 4 weeks.

Adapted from:

Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA). Global strategy for asthma management and prevention. GINA, 2012. Available from: http://www.ginasthma.org/

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Table. Definition of levels of recent asthma symptom control in children (regardless of current treatment regimen)

Good control Partial control Poor control

All of:

  • Daytime symptoms ≤2 days per week (lasting only a few minutes and rapidly relieved by rapid-acting bronchodilator)
  • No limitation of activities
  • No symptoms§ during night or when wakes up
  • Need for reliever# ≤2 days per week

Any of:

  • Daytime symptoms >2 days per week (lasting only a few minutes and rapidly relieved by rapid-acting bronchodilator)
  • Any limitation of activities*
  • Any symptoms during night or when wakes up††
  • Need for reliever# >2 days per week

Either of:

  • Daytime symptoms >2 days per week (lasting from minutes to hours or recurring, and partially or fully relieved by rapid-acting bronchodilator)
  • ≥3 features of partial control within the same week

† e.g. wheezing or breathing problems

‡ child is fully active; runs and plays without symptoms

§ including no coughing during sleep

# not including short-acting beta2 agonist taken prophylactically before exercise. (Record this separately and take into account when assessing management.)

* e.g. wheeze or breathlessness during exercise, vigorous play or laughing

†† e.g. waking with symptoms of wheezing or breathing problems

Note: Recent asthma control is based on symptoms over the previous 4 weeks. Each child’s risk factors for future asthma outcomes should also be assessed and taken into account in management.

Adapted from

Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA). Global strategy for the diagnosis and management of asthma in children 5 years and younger. GINA, 2009. Available from: http://www.ginasthma.org/

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How this recommendation was developed

Consensus

Based on clinical experience and expert opinion (informed by evidence, where available).

In adults, check risk factors and make sure the current treatment regimen is suitable for any risk factors identified.

Table. Risk factors for adverse asthma outcomes in adults and adolescents Opens in a new window Please view and print this figure separately: http://www.asthmahandbook.org.au/table/show/40

Table. Management of risk factors for adverse asthma outcomes in adults

Risk factor

Clinical action †

Any risk factor for flare-ups

Check patient has an appropriate action plan

Carefully check inhaler technique and adherence, and identify any barriers to good adherence

Review frequently (e.g. every 3 months)

Hospitalisation or ED visit for asthma or any asthma flare-up during the previous 12 months

Ask about triggers for flare-ups, and lead time

History of intubation or intensive care unit admission for asthma

Ensure action plan recommends early medical review when asthma worsens

Hospitalisation or ED visit for asthma in the past month

Emphasise importance of maintaining regular ICS use after symptoms improve

Confirm that patient has resumed using SABA only when needed for symptoms

High SABA use (>2 canisters per month)

Check lung function

If SABA use appears to be habitual, investigate causes and consider alternative strategies, e.g. short-term substitution of ipratropium for SABA

Long-term high-dose ICS

Consider gradual reduction of ICS dose if symptoms stable

Monitor regularly (e.g. assessment of bone density, regular eye examinations)

For local side-effects, ensure inhaler technique is appropriate

Poor lung function (even if few symptoms)

Consider 3-month trial of higher ICS dose, then recheck lung function

Consider referral for detailed specialist investigation

Sensitivity to unavoidable allergens (e.g. Alternaria species of common moulds)

Refer for further investigation and management

Exposure to cigarette smoke (smoking or environmental exposure)

Emphasise the importance of avoiding smoke

Provide quitting strategies

Consider increasing ICS dose (higher dose of ICS likely to be necessary to control asthma)

Refer for assessment of asthma–COPD overlap

Difficulty perceiving airflow limitation or the severity of exacerbations

Regular PEF monitoring

Action plan should recommend early review and measurement of lung function

No current written asthma action plan

Provide and explain written asthma action plan

† In addition to actions applicable to all risk factors

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How this recommendation was developed

Consensus

Based on clinical experience and expert opinion (informed by evidence, where available).

Check the preventer dose. (For children, check if the child’s weight has outgrown the preventer dose.)

How this recommendation was developed

Consensus

Based on clinical experience and expert opinion (informed by evidence, where available).

Check the treatment regimen specified in the patient’s written asthma action plan.

How this recommendation was developed

Consensus

Based on clinical experience and expert opinion (informed by evidence, where available).

More information

Classification of asthma severity and recent asthma symptom control in adults

Recent asthma symptom control

Recent asthma symptom control in adults is defined by frequency of symptoms, the degree to which symptoms affect sleep and activity, and the need for reliever medication over the previous 4 weeks.

Recent asthma symptom control is a component of overall asthma control. The other component is the risk of future events (e.g. flare-ups, life-threatening asthma, accelerated decline in lung function, or adverse effects of treatment).

Any experience of flare-ups or night-time waking due to asthma symptoms, even if infrequent, usually indicates that the person needs regular preventer treatment.

Table. Definition of levels of recent asthma symptom control in adults and adolescents (regardless of current treatment regimen)

Good control

Partial control

Poor control

All of:

  • Daytime symptoms ≤2 days per week
  • Need for reliever ≤2 days per week
  • No limitation of activities
  • No symptoms during night or on waking

One or two of:

  • Daytime symptoms >2 days per week
  • Need for reliever >2 days per week
  • Any limitation of activities
  • Any symptoms during night or on waking

Three or more of:

  • Daytime symptoms >2 days per week
  • Need for reliever >2 days per week
  • Any limitation of activities
  • Any symptoms during night or on waking

† Not including SABA taken prophylactically before exercise. (Record this separately and take into account when assessing management.)

Note: Recent asthma symptom control is based on symptoms over the previous 4 weeks.

Adapted from:

Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA). Global strategy for asthma management and prevention. GINA, 2012. Available from: http://www.ginasthma.org/

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Severity

Severity of asthma in adults is defined by the type and amount of treatment needed to maintain good control, not by the severity of acute flare-ups.

For patients prescribed a preventer, asthma severity can only be determined after using a preventer for at least 8 weeks and after checking adherence and inhaler technique.

Table. Definitions of asthma severity in adults in treatment

Severity

Treatment required to achieve good control †

Mild

Good control can be achieved with (any of):

  • intermittent reliever
  • low-dose inhaled corticosteroid
  • leukotriene receptor antagonist
  • cromone.

Moderate ‡

 

Good control can be achieved with (either of):

  • low- to-moderate dose of inhaled corticosteroid plus long-acting beta2 agonist
  • moderate dose of inhaled corticosteroid.

Severe ‡

Good control requires (or cannot be achieved despite) regular high dose of inhaled corticosteroid plus long-acting beta2 agonist.

Difficult-to-treat

Good control cannot be achieved despite treatment§ because of disease severity, comorbidities, persistent poor adherence or persistent smoking.

Severe treatment-resistant asthma (severe refractory asthma)

Good control requires (or cannot be achieved despite) regular high dose of inhaled corticosteroid plus long-acting beta2 agonist, in a patient in whom factors such as poor adherence, poor inhaler technique and comorbidities have been excluded.

† Good control is defined as all of the following: daytime symptoms on ≤2 days per week, need for reliever on ≤2 days per week, no limitation of activities, and no symptoms during night or on waking.

‡ If good control has been achieved for 2–3 months, the dose of inhaled corticosteroid should be down-titrated, if possible, to avoid misclassification due to over-treatment.

§ Repeated attempts to treat with appropriate medicines and self-management strategies

Source: Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA). Global strategy for asthma management and prevention. GINA; 2012. Available from: http://www.ginasthma.org/

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Assessing risk factors for adverse asthma outcomes in adults

Predicting poor asthma outcomes

As well as assessing recent asthma symptom control, it is necessary to assess each patient’s risk of future asthma events or adverse treatment effects. (Recent asthma symptom control and risk of adverse events are both components of overall asthma control.)

Table. Risk factors for adverse asthma outcomes in adults and adolescents Opens in a new window Please view and print this figure separately: http://www.asthmahandbook.org.au/table/show/40

Table. Management of risk factors for adverse asthma outcomes in adults

Risk factor

Clinical action †

Any risk factor for flare-ups

Check patient has an appropriate action plan

Carefully check inhaler technique and adherence, and identify any barriers to good adherence

Review frequently (e.g. every 3 months)

Hospitalisation or ED visit for asthma or any asthma flare-up during the previous 12 months

Ask about triggers for flare-ups, and lead time

History of intubation or intensive care unit admission for asthma

Ensure action plan recommends early medical review when asthma worsens

Hospitalisation or ED visit for asthma in the past month

Emphasise importance of maintaining regular ICS use after symptoms improve

Confirm that patient has resumed using SABA only when needed for symptoms

High SABA use (>2 canisters per month)

Check lung function

If SABA use appears to be habitual, investigate causes and consider alternative strategies, e.g. short-term substitution of ipratropium for SABA

Long-term high-dose ICS

Consider gradual reduction of ICS dose if symptoms stable

Monitor regularly (e.g. assessment of bone density, regular eye examinations)

For local side-effects, ensure inhaler technique is appropriate

Poor lung function (even if few symptoms)

Consider 3-month trial of higher ICS dose, then recheck lung function

Consider referral for detailed specialist investigation

Sensitivity to unavoidable allergens (e.g. Alternaria species of common moulds)

Refer for further investigation and management

Exposure to cigarette smoke (smoking or environmental exposure)

Emphasise the importance of avoiding smoke

Provide quitting strategies

Consider increasing ICS dose (higher dose of ICS likely to be necessary to control asthma)

Refer for assessment of asthma–COPD overlap

Difficulty perceiving airflow limitation or the severity of exacerbations

Regular PEF monitoring

Action plan should recommend early review and measurement of lung function

No current written asthma action plan

Provide and explain written asthma action plan

† In addition to actions applicable to all risk factors

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Poor clinical control, as indicated by frequent asthma symptoms and frequent reliever use, is a very strong predictor of the risk of flare-ups in the future. Any asthma flare-up during the previous 12 months indicates higher risk of flare-up over the next 12 months. A history  of artificial ventilation due to acute asthma, and admission to an intensive care unit due to acute asthma have been associated with increased risk of near-fatal asthma,1 but there is not enough evidence to indicate how long this risk may persist over a person’s lifetime. Other risk factors indicate increased probability of future flare-ups or accelerated decline in lung function, independent of the person’s level of recent asthma symptom control. 234

Other factors may increase a person’s risk of treatment-associated adverse effects. The most important of these are prescription of high dose treatment and frequent courses of oral steroids.

People with risk factors need more frequent asthma review, a carefully tailored written asthma action plan, and close attention to adherence and correct inhaler technique.

Inflammatory markers

Inflammatory markers, such as sputum eosinophil percentage or exhaled nitric oxide, are used in research and for managing severe asthma in patients attending secondary or tertiary care. Elevated sputum eosinophil levels and, to a lesser extent, elevated exhaled nitric oxide, are associated with increased risk of flare-ups. At present, treatment based on inflammatory markers is not recommended for routine use in primary care.

The value of inflammatory markers is being evaluated:

  • Adjusting asthma treatment by monitoring exhaled nitric oxide does not reduce the rate of flare-ups or improve asthma control in adults and children, compared with adjusting treatment according to clinical symptoms or spirometry, based on a meta-analysis of randomised controlled clinical trials.5 However, many of the studies were not optimally designed to answer this question,6 and some comparator regimens did not match current recommended treatment options.
  • In some studies, asthma treatment algorithms based on monitoring sputum eosinophil counts reduced flare-ups, compared with control-based management.7, 8 However, most studies assessing treatment guided by sputum eosinophilia have been conducted in selected populations in a few research centres, and therefore may not apply to the general community population. Assessment of sputum inflammatory cells is not generally available at present even in secondary care.
  • Limited evidence9 suggests that patients whose symptoms do not match their degree of eosinophilic inflammation may benefit more from treatment monitoring using sputum eosinophil count than other patients.
  • Monitoring inflammatory markers might enable safer down-titration of maintenance inhaled corticosteroid doses.
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Classification of recent asthma symptom control in children

Ongoing review of asthma involves both assessing recent asthma symptom control and assessing risks for poor asthma outcomes (e.g. flare-ups, adverse effects of medicines).

Recent asthma symptom control is assessed according to the frequency of asthma symptoms over the previous 4 weeks.

Table. Definition of levels of recent asthma symptom control in children (regardless of current treatment regimen)

Good control Partial control Poor control

All of:

  • Daytime symptoms ≤2 days per week (lasting only a few minutes and rapidly relieved by rapid-acting bronchodilator)
  • No limitation of activities
  • No symptoms§ during night or when wakes up
  • Need for reliever# ≤2 days per week

Any of:

  • Daytime symptoms >2 days per week (lasting only a few minutes and rapidly relieved by rapid-acting bronchodilator)
  • Any limitation of activities*
  • Any symptoms during night or when wakes up††
  • Need for reliever# >2 days per week

Either of:

  • Daytime symptoms >2 days per week (lasting from minutes to hours or recurring, and partially or fully relieved by rapid-acting bronchodilator)
  • ≥3 features of partial control within the same week

† e.g. wheezing or breathing problems

‡ child is fully active; runs and plays without symptoms

§ including no coughing during sleep

# not including short-acting beta2 agonist taken prophylactically before exercise. (Record this separately and take into account when assessing management.)

* e.g. wheeze or breathlessness during exercise, vigorous play or laughing

†† e.g. waking with symptoms of wheezing or breathing problems

Note: Recent asthma control is based on symptoms over the previous 4 weeks. Each child’s risk factors for future asthma outcomes should also be assessed and taken into account in management.

Adapted from

Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA). Global strategy for the diagnosis and management of asthma in children 5 years and younger. GINA, 2009. Available from: http://www.ginasthma.org/

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Approaches to assessment and monitoring of asthma control in children

Assessment of asthma control in children is based mainly on recent asthma symptom control (assessed by the frequency and severity of symptoms between flare-ups and the degree to which asthma symptoms affect daily activities such as interference with physical activity or missed school days), the frequency of flare-ups, and spirometry in children who are able to perform the test reliably.

Parents commonly underestimate the severity of their child's asthma and overestimate asthma control.10

Standardised questionnaires

Questionnaire-based instruments have been validated for assessing asthma control in children:

Measures of airway inflammation

Measures of airway inflammation (e.g. sputum test, exhaled nitric oxide) are not used in clinical practice to guide treatment decisions. Tailoring the dose of inhaled corticosteroids based on exhaled nitric oxide appears to achieve only a small benefit in children, and may lead to higher doses.5 

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Written asthma action plans for adults

Every person with asthma should have their own written asthma action plan.

When provided with appropriate self-management education, self-monitoring and medical review, individualised written action plans consistently improve asthma health outcomes if they include two to four action points, and provide instructions for use of both inhaled corticosteroid and oral corticosteroids for treatment of flare-ups.16 Written asthma action plans are effective if based on symptoms17 or personal best peak expiratory flow (not on percentage predicted).16

How to develop and review a written asthma action plan

A written asthma action plan should include all the following:

  • a list of the person’s usual medicines (names of medicines, doses, when to take each dose) – including treatment for related conditions such as allergic rhinitis
  • clear instructions on how to change medication (including when and how to start a course of oral corticosteroids) in all the following situations:
    • when asthma is getting worse (e.g. when needing more reliever than usual, waking up with asthma, more symptoms than usual, asthma is interfering with usual activities)
    • when asthma symptoms get substantially worse (e.g. when needing reliever again within 3 hours, experiencing increasing difficulty breathing, waking often at night with asthma symptoms)
    • when peak flow falls below an agreed rate (for those monitoring peak flow each day)
    • during an asthma emergency.
  • instructions on when and how to get medical care (including contact telephone numbers)
  • the name of the person writing the action plan, and the date it was issued.

Table. Options for adjusting medicines in a written asthma action plan for adults Opens in a new window Please view and print this figure separately: http://www.asthmahandbook.org.au/table/show/42

Table. Checklist for reviewing a written asthma action plan

  • Ask if the person (or parent) knows where their written asthma action plan is.
  • Ask if they have used their written asthma action plan because of worsening asthma.
  • Ask if the person (or parent) has had any problems using their written asthma action plan, or has any comments about whether they find it suitable and effective.
  • Check that the medication recommendations are appropriate to the person’s current treatment.
  • Check that all action points are appropriate to the person’s level of recent asthma symptom control.
  • Check that the person (or parent) understands and is satisfied with the action points.
  • If the written asthma action plan has been used because of worsening asthma more than once in the past 12 months: review the person's usual asthma treatment, adherence, inhaler technique, and exposure to avoidable trigger factors.
  • Check that the contact details for medical care and acute care are up to date.

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Templates for written asthma action plans

Templates are available from National Asthma Council Australia:

  • National Asthma Council Australia colour-coded plan, available as a printed handout that folds to wallet size and as the Asthma Buddy smartphone application
  • Asthma Cycle of Care asthma action plan
  • A plan designed for patients using budesonide/formoterol combination as maintenance and reliever therapy
  • Remote Indigenous Australian Asthma Action Plan
  • Every Day Asthma Action Plan (designed for remote Indigenous Australians who do not use written English – may also be useful for others for whom written English is inappropriate).

Some written asthma action plans are available in community languages.

Software for developing electronic pictorial asthma action plans1819 is available online.

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Written asthma action plans for children

Every child with asthma should have their own written asthma action plan.

A systematic review found that the use of written asthma action plans significantly reduces the rate of visits to acute care facilities, the number of school days missed and night-time waking, and improves symptoms.20 Symptom-based plans were more effective than peak flow-based plans for reducing the risk of acute care visits in children and adolescents.20

Written asthma action plans that are based on symptoms appear to be more effective than action plans based on peak expiratory flow monitoring for children and adolescents.20

A written asthma action plan should include all the following:

  • a list of the child’s usual medicines (names of medicines, doses, when to take each dose) – including treatment for related conditions such as allergic rhinitis
  • clear instructions on what to do in all the following situations:
    • when asthma is getting worse (e.g. when needing more reliever than usual, waking up with asthma, more symptoms than usual, asthma is interfering with usual activities)
    • when asthma symptoms get substantially worse (e.g. when needing reliever again within 3 hours, experiencing increasing difficulty breathing, waking often at night with asthma symptoms)
    • during an asthma emergency.
  • instructions on when and how to get medical care (including contact telephone numbers)
  • the name and contact details of the child’s emergency contact person (e.g. parent)
  • the name of the person writing the action plan, and the date it was issued.

Table. Checklist for reviewing a written asthma action plan

  • Ask if the person (or parent) knows where their written asthma action plan is.
  • Ask if they have used their written asthma action plan because of worsening asthma.
  • Ask if the person (or parent) has had any problems using their written asthma action plan, or has any comments about whether they find it suitable and effective.
  • Check that the medication recommendations are appropriate to the person’s current treatment.
  • Check that all action points are appropriate to the person’s level of recent asthma symptom control.
  • Check that the person (or parent) understands and is satisfied with the action points.
  • If the written asthma action plan has been used because of worsening asthma more than once in the past 12 months: review the person's usual asthma treatment, adherence, inhaler technique, and exposure to avoidable trigger factors.
  • Check that the contact details for medical care and acute care are up to date.

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Templates for written asthma action plans

Templates are available from National Asthma Council Australia:

  • National Asthma Council Australia colour-coded plan, available as a printed handout that folds to wallet size and as the Asthma Buddy smartphone application
  • Asthma Cycle of Care asthma action plan
  • A plan designed for patients using budesonide/formoterol combination as maintenance and reliever therapy
  • Remote Indigenous Australian Asthma Action Plan
  • Every Day Asthma Action Plan (designed for remote Indigenous Australians who do not use written English – may also be useful for others for whom written English is inappropriate)
  • Children’s written asthma action plans.

Some written asthma action plans are available in community languages.

Software for developing electronic pictorial asthma action plans1819 is available online.

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Self-monitoring in adults using peak expiratory flow

Peak flow monitoring is no longer routinely used in Australia, but is recommended for patients with severe asthma, a history of frequent flare-ups, or poor perception of airflow limitation.

Peak expiratory flow can be monitored at home using a mechanical or electronic peak flow meter, either regularly every day or when symptoms are worse. For patients who are willing to measure peak flow regularly, morning and evening readings can be plotted on a graph or recorded in a diary.

When peak flow monitoring results are recorded on a graph, the same chart should be used consistently so that patterns can be recognised. Flare-ups are easier to detect when the chart or image has a low ratio of width to height (aspect ratio), i.e. is compressed horizontally.21

When a person’s written asthma action plan is based on peak expiratory flow, instructions should be based on personal best, rather than predicted values. Personal best can be determined as the highest reading over the previous 2 weeks. When a person begins high-dose inhaled corticosteroid treatment, personal best peak expiratory flow reaches a plateau within a few weeks with twice daily monitoring.22

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References

  1. Turner MO, Noertjojo K, Vedal S, et al. Risk factors for near-fatal asthma. A case-control study in hospitalized patients with asthma. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998; 157: 1804-9. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9620909
  2. Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA). Global strategy for asthma management and prevention. GINA, 2012. Available from: http://www.ginasthma.org
  3. Thomas M, Kay S, Pike J, et al. The Asthma Control Test (ACT) as a predictor of GINA guideline-defined asthma control: analysis of a multinational cross-sectional survey. Prim Care Respir J. 2009; 18: 41-49. Available from: http://www.nature.com/articles/pcrj200910
  4. Osborne ML, Pedula KL, O'Hollaren M, et al. Assessing future need for acute care in adult asthmatics: the Profile of Asthma Risk Study: a prospective health maintenance organization-based study. Chest. 2007; 132: 1151-61. Available from: http://journal.publications.chestnet.org/article.aspx?articleid=1085456
  5. Petsky HL, Cates CJ, Li A, et al. Tailored interventions based on exhaled nitric oxide versus clinical symptoms for asthma in children and adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009; Issue 4: CD006340. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD006340.pub3/full
  6. Gibson PG. Using fractional exhaled nitric oxide to guide asthma therapy: design and methodological issues for asthma treatment algorithm studies. Clin Exp Allergy. 2009; 39: 478-490. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19260871
  7. Taylor DR, Bateman ED, Boulet LP, et al. A new perspective on concepts of asthma severity and control. Eur Respir J. 2008; 32: 545-554. Available from: http://erj.ersjournals.com/content/32/3/545.long
  8. Petsky HL, Cates CJ, Lasserson TJ, et al. A systematic review and meta-analysis: tailoring asthma treatment on eosinophilic markers (exhaled nitric oxide or sputum eosinophils). Thorax. 2012; 67: 199-208. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20937641
  9. Haldar P, Pavord ID, Shaw DE, et al. Cluster analysis and clinical asthma phenotypes. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008; 178: 218-224. Available from: http://ajrccm.atsjournals.org/content/178/3/218.full
  10. Carroll WD, Wildhaber J, Brand PL. Parent misperception of control in childhood/adolescent asthma: The room to breathe survey. Eur Respir J. 2011; 39: 90-96. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21700607
  11. Juniper EF, Gruffydd-Jones K, Ward S, Svensson K. Asthma Control Questionnaire in children: validation, measurement properties, interpretation. Eur Respir J. 2010; 36: 1410-6. Available from: http://erj.ersjournals.com/content/36/6/1410.long
  12. Murphy KR, Zeiger RS, Kosinski M, et al. Test for respiratory and asthma control in kids (TRACK): a caregiver-completed questionnaire for preschool-aged children. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009; 123: 833-9. Available from: http://www.jacionline.org/article/S0091-6749(09)00212-7/fulltext
  13. Zeiger RS, Mellon M, Chipps B, et al. Test for Respiratory and Asthma Control in Kids (TRACK): clinically meaningful changes in score. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2011; 128: 983-8. Available from: http://www.jacionline.org/article/S0091-6749(11)01287-5/fulltext
  14. Liu AH, Zeiger R, Sorkness C, et al. Development and cross-sectional validation of the Childhood Asthma Control Test. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007; 119: 817-25. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17353040
  15. Liu AH, Zeiger RS, Sorkness CA, et al. The Childhood Asthma Control Test: retrospective determination and clinical validation of a cut point to identify children with very poorly controlled asthma. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010; 126: 267-73, 273.e1. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20624640
  16. Gibson PG, Powell H. Written action plans for asthma: an evidence-based review of the key components. Thorax. 2004; 59: 94-99. Available from: http://thorax.bmj.com/content/59/2/94.full
  17. Powell H, Gibson PG. Options for self-management education for adults with asthma. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2002; Issue 3: CD004107. Available from: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD004107/full
  18. Roberts NJ, Mohamed Z, Wong PS, et al. The development and comprehensibility of a pictorial asthma action plan. Patient Educ Couns. 2009; 74: 12-18. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18789626
  19. Roberts NJ, Evans G, Blenkhorn P, Partridge M. Development of an electronic pictorial asthma action plan and its use in primary care. Patient Educ Couns. 2010; 80: 141-146. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19879092
  20. Zemek RL, Bhogal S, Ducharme FM. Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Examining Written Action Plans in Children - What Is the Plan?. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2008; 162: 157-63. Available from: http://archpedi.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=379087#tab1
  21. Jansen J, McCaffery KJ, Hayen A, et al. Impact of graphic format on perception of change in biological data: implications for health monitoring in conditions such as asthma. Prim Care Respir J. 2012; 21: 94-100. Available from: http://www.nature.com/articles/pcrj20124
  22. Reddel HK, Marks GB, Jenkins CR. When can personal best peak flow be determined for asthma action plans?. Thorax. 2004; 59: 922-4. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1746886/